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TopicSurvival Skill - Physical Fitness

  • Fri 10th Mar 2017 - 4:57am

    In nature, depression is normal: it is a survival mechanism. Depression is the body and brain's response to famine, excess food intake, and inactivity. As we evolved over millions of years of harsh winters on the African savannah, it was this "survival depression" that kept us alive until the The Achievable Body Review warmth of spring. We hunted and gathered every single day; we were only sedentary if there was a famine. As winter, drought or famine approached, we became sedentary, built up our fat reserves, made our shelters to hibernate: we burrowed for warmth, and safety, in small spaces that made it impossible to move, further slowing down our metabolism. These natural behaviors signaled the critical systems in our bodies and brains to shutdown, decay, atrophy, loose their muscles, in order to survive the winter. Survival depression was our healthy response to our environment. Now here we are in 2008, with lengthy commutes to work, whole days sitting at our computers, with little movement of our bodies

    Staying young and controlling the rate at which you age, is the direct result of innocent, but lethal choices that you make everyday. When we don't send out the signals everyday to our bodies to 'hunt, and forage'; eventually this constant state of decay takes over. And as we chronically age, the rate of this decline, and decay just accelerates. (Our bodies and brains are just responding. No wonder that we have a picture of aging in America that is one of decay, decline. Our modern lifestyle is killing us) Humans evolved over billions of years of surviving winter life on the African Tundra. In a modern sense, a sedentary life of making poor nutritional choices under constant stress for decades, signals our bodies and brains that we are still surviving winter on the African Tundra. The reasons are clear and simple as to why we age so poorly in America.

     

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